In the 80s everything seemed to scream Go big or go home, not only metaphorically (Who dares wins), but also in the literal sense.

The bigger the better was the order of the day: in the size of objects, quantity of furnishings and accessories, in the choice of materials. At times a decadent luxury, rich in gold and fluorescent tones, accentuated modernism or echoes of the Renaissance.

As we have said, the important thing was to exaggerate.

A Palm Beach hotel in the 1980’s, from the book Decoration and Design for the 80s by Pamela Ferguson, 1983
Project from The Media Design Book by Philip Mazzurco, 1984 (source: The 80s Interior)

Something of this legacy remains today, infiltrating year after year the lookbooks of the most popular interior designers and furniture companies. The throwbacks to the glittering years of pop are evident, but with a lighter style.

High ceilings, club-style furnishings, large panoramic windows and modern shapes: a luxury that eliminates the “noisy” elements of the 1980s while maintaining their grandeur, drawing inspiration from Scandinavian minimalism.

The maxi armchairs remain but the cushions are gone, same with the elaborate chandeliers but the trinkets and ornaments disappear completely. Few elements, showy, but carefully chosen.

The effect is that of early James Bond style furniture: a futuristic, minimalist and high-level design.

Kos Palazzetti finishings

For larger spaces, a return to the past also implies a renewal of our love of the fireplace, an unfailing status symbol in the homes of the 1980s upper classes.

Ore is chosen, however, with modern, made-to-measure finishings which clearly have a hi-tech feel to them.

Like the WT stove for example, which lends its efficiency to the futuristic Kos design finishing: a white marble island creates an impactful contrast with the oak riser and the entire structure that reaches right up to the ceiling creates an unforgettable play of space.

A daydream, but not totally.